Calligrapher Interview Laura Worthington Part I

laura worthington interview besotted blog

Ah, a Laura Worthington interview, you all are in for a real treat! If Laura’s name seems familiar it’s because  we have featured her fonts before and if you have been lurking around our fave font shop, Laura is quite the prolific font designer/lettering artist.  It is a privilege to be able to feature her today. This is part I of her interview, there’s so much good information that we didn’t want to overload you and allow you to take it all in! If you have questions be sure to leave them in the comments. Thank you Laura for such a detailed and inspired interview!

Where are you located?

Bonney Lake, Washington – which is about 50 miles south of Seattle

 How did you get started in lettering?

When I was nine years old, instead of learning the standard roundhand cursive styles typically taught, my 4th grade teacher had opted to teach us italic printing instead. Her handwriting was beautiful and the way she described how to construct the letterforms and what they should look like in their ideal state struck a chord with me. I was smitten and knew immediately that this would become a passion of mine. My mother, at the same time, was taking a calligraphy course at a community college. It was a perfect storm of events that set forth my future – from that moment on, I studied and practiced calligraphy and anytime I handwrote notes, essays, journal entries, et cetera, I viewed it as an opportunity to perfect my handwriting and train my hands and eyes. All throughout school I lettered certificates, wedding envelopes, poems and anything else. I taught myself many of the basic hands from calligraphy books. Chancerian, Foundational, Carolingian, various forms of Blackletter and so on.

 What are some of your favorite supplies?

For paper, I love Rhodia dot pads, Borden & Riley Cotton Comp and Vellum, Canson Marker and Vellum as well. For ink, I like Moon Palace sumi ink as well and I use Noodler’s ink with my treasured wet noodle fountain pens, which I collect.

For nibs, there are quite a few I like. For steel dip nibs, I prefer the Brause Rose, Nikko G and the Hiro Blue Pumpkin. For most of my pointed nib lettering these days, however, I use wet noodle fountain pens, especially for practice. My favorites are the Waterman Ideal #2 and Mabie Todd. What I love about wet noodle fountain pens is their convenience and ease of use. All of mine are either lever or eyedropper filled, so you can write quite a bit without needing to refill them every couple of letters as you must with dip pens which means I can practice in the evening while sitting on my couch watching a movie with my husband, or sitting outside in my garden. Also, the wet noodles are often extremely smooth and responsive, so you don’t have to be as careful with upstrokes that often damage the tines of a steel dip nib.

For brushes, I use Pentel Colorbrushes,Prismacolor Faber Castell felt brushes, DaVinci Maestro pointed brushes and Raphael Kolinsky. For chisel edge brushes I use Windsor & Newton.

What are some of your inspirations?

I am such a visual person that most of my inspiration comes from what I see. I love to check in with what other lettering artists, type designers, graphic designers and illustrators are doing. But most of my inspiration comes from just simple lettering practice when I have no goal in mind other than the sheer pleasure that comes from applying ink to paper.

To be cont.

//Resources mentioned//

Rhodia dot pads

Borden & Riley Cotton Comp and Vellum

Canson Marker and Vellum

Moon Palace sumi ink

Noodler’s ink

Wet noodle fountain pens

Brause Rose

Nikko G

Hiro Blue Pumpkin

The Waterman Ideal #2

Mabie Todd

Pentel Colorbrushes

Faber Castell felt brushes

DaVinci Maestro pointed brushes

Raphael Kolinsky

Windsor & Newton Chisel edge brushes

 

 

Stephanie Fishwick Interview Part II

Stephanie Fishwick Interview Part II via Besotted Blog

Thank you everyone to the positive feedback on Stephanie’s part I interview, so happy to hear that you love her as much as we do!  Stephanie did not hold back and I think you will find a ton of supplies + resources to look into after this interview. Also, a Happy Birthday to Stephanie is in order!  Thank you Stephanie so much for making this such an amazing interview!

//STEPHANIE FISHWISCK INTERVIEW PART II//

What are some of your favorite supplies?

My favorite things now are my ruling pens and folded pen. I’m also loving a folded pen I made from a coke can. When doing pointed pen work, my favorite every-day supplies are the hourglass adjustable oblique pen holder with a Nikko G nib. The Tachikawa T-36 is my favorite straight holder. For brush lettering I use the Cotman 222 series brushes by Windsor & Newton, Rekab No. 314 Kolinsky Sable Brushes and various synthetic brushes with tiny tips. I love my bamboo brush. I use carbon-based black ink, pigmented ink for a luminous or crystalline look, and acrylic ink for color. Higgins Eternal is my favorite carbon-based ink. It’s great and very affordable and I go through black ink fast. I also love Moon Palace sumi ink. For acrylic work I am a big fan of Dr. Ph. Martins series. (Acrylic inks require more cleaning and attention to the nib, but I prefer them to gouache). I use a lot of watercolor in my work, as well. Favorite papers: hot press and cold press watercolor papers. For large final pieces I use 110 lb – 300 lb mould-made, pH neutral, papers that are 100% cotton. Some favorite brands are Fabriano, Aquarelle, Ingres and Arches. For things I will scan, as opposed to an original art piece, I like Canson Market Pro Layout or even 100% cotton resume paper that I find at an office supply store. The lower-end pads of Canson and Strathmore, cold-press 140lb paper for example, are great for my drafts or quick work.

Can you go a little into your process of how you work on a project?

My process is hard to describe. I had to ask my husband about his observations before I could put this into words! I write down ideas in lists a lot and mull things over in my head for a bit before drawing it out. I may spend two days thinking about an idea and then I’ll put it to paper in lots of different versions. Other times I’ll just want to do calligraphy without any goal in mind and come up with something I love. Many days I will sketch or write like 30 pages worth of quotes or words before I come up with the final piece that I like…or nothing good at all. Sometimes after writing a word 50 times I realize one of the first ones was my favorite. For client work I am way more scheduled and organized.

Any tips for newbies on how to develop their own style?

I would encourage newbies to learn Copperplate from a teacher who has mastered the form. Acquire the best materials, and set up a designated calligraphy work space for yourself. Everyone’s hand is different, so literally going with your flow will produce unique results. I think that any new styles work best when the architecture of the letters come from traditional copperplate.

Any recommendations of books or classes for lettering enthusiasts to further their studies?

Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy: A Step-by-Step Manual by Eleanor Winters, Calligraphy in the Copperplate Style by Herb Kaufman, Foundations of Calligraphy by Sheila Waters, Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age by Steven Heller and Louise Fili, Zanerian.com: Dr. Joe Vitolo’s site chock full of tutorials, lessons, guides, you-name-it, he’s got it covered., IAMPETH: The go-to for all-things pointed pen, and classes in your area. Check out your local guild for information on local classes. A Place to Flourish has a nice round-up of US Guilds.

Do you have some favorite projects you would like me to mention?

I create these little crests and wedding monograms and I recently launched a way for anyone to create their own custom piece on my site.

I’m working on a book cover right now that I’m really excited about. Last month I calligraphed tattoos for a couple celebrating their anniversary, which was just too cool.

Any advice on what ‘not’ to do?

Don’t doubt yourself as a lettering artist. I find it difficult to do that in the face of the internet, and basic human nature for comparison. I would say don’t get complacent in your study of fine art, its history, and your personal inspirations as you create your own style. This is something I am constantly working at.

Name one random talent you have that people may not know?

For a long time I was big into making artist books! I don’t make them anymore, but it fits well with calligraphy so maybe I will bring that back someday!

 

Stephanie Fishwick Interview Part I

stephaniefw_besottedinterview

This interview has been a long time coming and I have unfortunately (and unfairly) been sitting on it for way too long. How could I?  I will blame it on sleep deprivation, I hope both you and the talented Stephanie Fishwick will take that as a legitimate excuse and forgive me the long wait. I must preface this interview by saying that Stephanie’s work is a Besotted fave, we are uber fans, so much so that we tapped Stephanie to work on illustrations for our top secret project, that hopefully will not take as long to launch as this here interview.

If you are not familiar with her work I think you will be pleasantly surprised to discover such an amazingly, fresh, talented original artist. Stephanie’s interview is as thorough and detailed as her work, I think as a fellow lettering enthusiasts you will love it. So without further ado…

[Read more...]

Vintage Inspired Font Family

vintageinspiredfontviabesottedblog

I love a good font family, you? True North by Cultivated mind is truly a great find. If you have been itching to add a vintage family to your font arsenal so you could re-create all those popular hipster icons you see everywhere then I highly recommend it.  It’s also 50% off right now until August 9th, so I would scoop it up while they are practically giving it away.  Although, I like the family as a whole, (their sample graphics give plenty of jumping off inspiration to get you started on your own hipster design bonanza), what I really think is great (and versatile) is the script font it reminds me of another font that I have been coveting but at a fraction of the price (for now).  I like that it can easily be taken out of context here and used when there was a need for a school girl type font (for lack of a better descriptive). It’s just girly enough without verging into the too sweet category. I also like their banners (this is free!), labels and symbols (a good bear graphic is hard to find). Well, I better stop blabbering on about True North since time is running out on the discount and you need to get over there quick! See you soon!

P.S. If you ever use any of the fonts we suggest in your designs and want to share please send us an email, we would love to see what you have created!

LETTERING SUPPLY RESOURCE LIST!

huge lettering supply list besotted blog

I have wanted to create this for a while, but it was easier said than done!  I have finally put together a list of supplies to start your lettering journey in an easy (I hope) visual guide. I didn’t get specific on all the nibs or nib holders, I may create another gallery for a more advanced supplies list but this is the list I get the most emails on and it covers everything from books/classes to the paper and ink I recommend.

If you have questions or have requests of what you would like to find lettering wise, please let me know and I will try to address them for future add-ons to the gallery.

Be back soon!

P.S. The lettering font I used at the top of the post can be found here!

Blog by Hello Monday Creative