25 Amazing Resources to becoming a better artist

25+ Amazing Resources to learn to draw! You can do it, we believe in you!

I was very touched by all your answers for the skill question giveaway. So many of these skills are most definitely achievable in this lifetime, I do hope you explore some of these resources.  I have mentioned some of these resources in previous posts, but I figure if you decided you wanted to get started (it seems time is definitely a factor stopping a lot of us), then I should make it as easy as possible so you can just dive into learning your new skills. Maybe I shouldn’t have titled this ‘becoming a better artist’, because art is subjective, someone might think you are incredible right now, but I do understand that what most of you want to do is better develop your skills and I can say from experience that drawing emphatically is not a skill that you have to be born with to become great at (I’m not great by any stretch of the imagination but I  improved dramatically from stick figures to realistic animals in about 6 months time). You will need to devote some time, practice my friends seems to be the ‘secret’ to skill building. Below are some great resources for you to get started. I can’t wait to see what you all can accomplish!Read More

How to Access Glyphs in Photoshop

How-to Access Hidden Font Features via Besotted

Did you know that there are secret extra characters built into many of the fonts we feature here? You can find everything from ligatures, to alternate characters, to fun ornaments – whatever the font designer felt necessary. These characters are collectively called glyphs, and they are not only fun to use, but they are the key to making a hand lettered or calligraphic font look realistic!

If you are a graphic designer, and glyphs are old hat, you may not know that the latest version of Photoshop (finally) has a glyphs panel! That’s right, you don’t have to open Illustrator, and your command C / command V fingers can take a well-deserved break if you are designing something for web.

View the tutorial after the jump! Read More

Photoshop Clipping Mask Tutorial

Clipping Mask Tutorial via Besotted Blog

We are super excited to share this next Photoshop tutorial with you. We are trying to create tutorials that are super easy to accomplish and accessible for even the most novice of Photoshop users. As you know we are super fans of the software and want you to feel the same way too. Being able to harness the power of Photoshop can unleash a flurry of creative projects that you can use for your business, blog, hobby the possibilities are endless! In this tutorial we will be showing you how to place your artwork (or photo) into a shape, in Photoshop this is called using a Clipping Mask. We have made the geometric shape in the image available for you to download for a limited time, so download while it’s available. This technique is so simple and the results super fast. We hope you enjoy! Please let us know in the comments if you have any questions. Video tutorial is after the jump!Read More

A COLLECTION OF DOUBLE EXPOSURE TUTORIALS

sara byrne double exposure besotted blogsara byrne double exposure ii besotted blog Sigh, I just love these images by photographer Sara Byrne. I have been wanting to try this for awhile. Lucky for us Sara and her husband/partner Dylan were generous with their talent and created a step-by-step tutorial and video! Their tutorial is with a Canon 5D Mark iii, (which is a full frame camera), but I know some of the entry level full frame cameras also have the double exposure option! But if you don’t have a full frame camera, don’t fret I went on an internet treasure hunt and found other camera options and tutorials for you so you can give this technique a go!

Have you tried this already? If so is there a way that you did it that was different from the tutorials linked? We’d love to see your results if you try so stop back with a link we can visit!

P.S. I am going to write a totally unscientific and biased post soon on when it’s time to upgrade to a full frame camera, so be on the look out for that!

//TUTORIALS+ RESOURCES//

Double Exposure Tutorial by Sara & Dylan

Double Exposure Tutorial with Iphone

Double Exposure Tutorial + Interview with Iphoneograher Brandon Kidwell

Double Exposure Tutorial in Photoshop

Double Exposure Tutorial in Photoshop Advanced

Canon Mark D III

Canon EOS 6D

Photographer Photoshop + Lightroom Bundle

Author / Miss Tristan B

Miss Tristan B. is the proprietress of Besotted Brand and one of the writer’s of this delightful blog. She lives in sunny Seattle with her handsome husband, wonderful baby girl and two pups. Her lofty goal here is to make this a creative resource repository and to inspire you to fall truly, madly, deeply in love with your life.

Home Printer Q & A

printing from home part ii besotted blog

We received a lot of emails wanting more questions answered on the home printing front, we thought it’d be easier to answer them here than individually. If you have more questions let us know and we’ll try to add the answers to this post. Below are some of the most asked questions on home printing:

What home printer can I print heavier cardstock with?

This is not an easy one to answer, most home printers are not made to handle heavier than 120# cardstock. I have had the most success with printers that load paper/cardstock upright in the back, you can feed the cardstock through. When I had my very first Etsy stationery company, I would painstakingly do this one card at a time, it was torture!  Another printer that has a completely different finish (uses wax for the inks) and supposedly can take heavier stock is the Xerox Phaser. The finish is very unique and not for everyone, I liked it even though I prefer a matte finish, it’s definitely worth getting a sample print from the company. I worked with a small invite company that loved hers and used heavier stocks through her Phaser. For extra heavy stock I would suggest paper mounting, but that would be a topic for another post!

What printer can I use to print on fabric?

Again, I would suggest a printer that is loaded upright in the back. There’s so many ways to do this but Karen from the Graphics Fairy has an excellent tutorial!

Even with my screen calibrated my prints come out different, how can I fix this?

If you calibrated and set up the color profiles and still no luck–test print, test print, test print (in smaller versions of your original)! Michelle had addressed this briefly here. When I was trying to match colors for my stationery company I would print various boxes of the color in different tones to see how my printer would print and choose the one closest to my vision (which may have looked completely different on screen). Yes, printing at home has it’s pros (control) but some of the cons can make you pull your hair out (no control).

I want to print on shipping tags or other things that aren’t a standard paper size, how can I do that?

When I want to print on something that is not a typical size I will use artist tape (it doesn’t rip your paper when you remove it) to tape down my item that I intend to print onto a standard letter size paper and then run it through. The BEST tutorial on this is by Catherine of Design Editor and you can find it here, it’s a printing game changer!

Want to print on more atypical items? Here’s a small list:

Print on paper napkins

Print on ribbon

//RESOURCES//

Back loading printers-inexpensive, moderate, expensive (pro)

Xerox Phaser solid ink printer

Artist tape