The Mega List of How-to Digitize Your Lettering Tutorials

 

how to digitize your hand lettering via besotted blog

This seems to be the most requested tutorial here, I understand the desire especially if you have been dipping your toes in the hand lettering pool and now want to be able to showcase your work to the world! I hope I have rounded up enough tutorials to thoroughly get you through this process. Some of these tutorials will be step-by-step, others videos, of course some may be better than others but they all have great information to glean and I hope you find this post to be a useful future resource. If you have any questions please let us know!

//FREE DIGITIZING LETTERING TUTORIALS//

Hand lettering from pencil sketch to digital graphic

Making your lettering into a vector graphic

 Making your lettering available for web*

A beginner’s guide to spiffing up your hand lettering

Using the calligraphic brush to create decorative type

Hand lettering in Illustrator (this is great for learning about the Wacom tablet settings)

How to digitize brush or hand lettering

How to digitize your calligraphy

*Note her tutorial reads to save as a ‘gif’, but I always save as either a .png or .jpeg for web unless the graphic is animated then I use the .gif file format

//PAID DIGITIZING LETTERING CLASSES/TUTORIALS//

Digitizing your calligraphy with Molly Suber Thorpe

Introduction to the Wacom tablet

How to turn your handlettering into vectors

Digitizing hand lettering: creating organic and precise vectors

Lettering II by Mary Kate McDevitt

//RESOURCES/TOOLS//

These are some of the tools that you will need or read about in the tutorials that will help make your digitizing life a whole lot easier.

Adobe Photoshop or Adobe Photoshop Elements

Adobe Illustrator

Wacom tablet (there’s entry level versions that are affordable)

Scanner

Lettering Supplies

P.S. That awesome font ‘lettering’ is in is available here

Author / Miss Tristan B

Miss Tristan B. is the proprietress of Besotted Brand and one of the writer’s of this delightful blog. She lives in sunny Seattle with her handsome husband, wonderful baby girl and two pups. Her lofty goal here is to make this a creative resource repository and to inspire you to fall truly, madly, deeply in love with your life.

DIY FLORAL ARRANGEMENT WITH MCKENZIE POWELL

Mckenzie Powell Design besotted blog i

It’s a new year and a new you, better than ever!  Let’s make this a year of learning, expanding your creative skill set and enhancing your life, are you with me?  Have you ever considered trying your hand at a floral arrangement? A thoughtful arrangement can be pulled together fairly quickly, is appreciated by just about everyone, and  there is zero commitment needed if the recipient isn’t head over heels for your thoughtfully chosen florals (silly them). Floral design really is an art, so we thought it best to consult an expert to find out the best way to approach building a small arrangement.

If you aren’t already familiar with McKenzie of McKenzie Powell Designs, she is a premier floral & event designer based here in Seattle (she designs for destination events as well). McKenzie’s florals feel simultaneously lush & organic, appearing effortless but in reality, every detail is carefully considered. We are head over heels for her work (and her), and are certain you will be too!

[Read more...]

STAMPING PERFECTLY ON COTTON BAGS

stamping on cotton bags besotted blog

Technically you could use my technique to stamp on most fabrics, but for the purpose of this tutorial I will focus on the cotton drawstring bags since this is the fabric I most stamp on in my day-to-day fabric stamping adventures.  Also, with the holidays upon us I think the fabric bags make a great alternative to packaging that will be thrown by the wayside.  These bags tend to be thin and wrinkle quite easily so I always iron prior to stamping as you want to have as flat a surface as possible.  Stamping is not as forgiving as other printing techniques and you do want your substrate (what you are stamping on) as smooth as possible so start with ironed fabric without a lot of texture (so nothing nubby, ribbed, raised, furry, etc.)  My most secret of tools for ironing these tiny bags quickly and without dragging out my ironing board and iron is an old hair straightener, yes a hair straightener.  You don’t need a fancy one, just a cheapy that heats up to a nice temp (mine goes as high as 450 f) that will actually iron out your wrinkles;  I just clamp down on one end and pull it through the iron and it is perfect every time!  The iron is now dedicated for crafting, which I would suggest for yours as well.  Once you have a nice ironed bag you will want to put a piece of thick + stiff cardstock in it.  This serves two purposes 1) it makes for a nice stiff surface to stamp on and 2) it will prevent the ink from bleeding to the other side. I just cut down a piece of scrap cardstock to size and use it over and over (if there’s no ink that has seeped through). [Read more...]

HOW-TO (PROPERLY) CLEAN YOUR RED RUBBER STAMPS

how-to clean your rubberstamps besotted blog

I have tried many different methods of cleaning my red rubberstamps and the one above is the easiest, fastest and the least amount of mess.  My secret? I use an unscented baby wipe! It must be unscented as fragrance will deteriorate your stamp and it must be a baby wipe, as anti-bacterial type wipes or other cleaning wipes have solvents that again break down your red rubber which is a natural substance. The baby wipes have glycerin in them which not only cleans the stamp but conditions it as well. The baby wipes work really well to clean multiple types of ink but I mainly stick to pigment inks since it has such a large range of what you can stamp on. The trick here is to dab at your stamp rather than rubbing your wipe side-to-side, you want to avoid leaving any fibers on the stamp surface which could effect your future stamping endeavors. If you want to keep your stamps like new (which will result in a better stamped impression) clean them after every use, with the wipes this makes this once cumbersome task pretty effortless!

Let me know if you have any questions or if you have another way that you think might be better.  Oh, and I don’t know how this would work on clear stamps, they are made of polymer so I think it would be a trial and error situation, possibly more error. Next week I will go over how to stamp on cloth, some tricks I have learned along the way!

P.S. Looking for a little Inspiration Rx? It will be up later today!

P.P.S. Special thanks again to my model Michelle for her patience and pro skills!

Author / Miss Tristan B

Miss Tristan B. is the proprietress of Besotted Brand and the writer of this delightful blog. She recently re-located to sunny Seattle with her handsome husband and two pups, they are expecting a baby girl in December (possibly November). Her lofty goal here is to make this a creative resource repository and to inspire you to fall truly, madly, deeply in love with your life.

HOW-TO EMBOSS WITH RUBBERSTAMPS | SUPPLIES PART I

Embossing Supplies Besotted Blog

I had originally created this tutorial for another blog that I admire, so much so that I didn’t think it was good enough for them, but I do hope you still like and garner some good info from it!  Recently I have had an onslaught of emails on using white ink with kraft paper (a wonderful combo!) and how the results people were getting were not as great as they had anticipated.  Firstly, I would like to preface this by saying stamping, even though it formerly has been relegated to the craft realm it is actually a legit printing technique and takes some practice. You wouldn’t expect to have no experience with letterpress printing and belly up to the machine and have a perfect go at it would you?  Of course not!  So, give yourself a break and assume your first trial runs will be less than what you desire. Practice makes perfect–pinky promise.

Although, I wholeheartedly believe you can get great results using this white ink, you can get even better (and more professional ones) by going the embossing route. Embossing is simply having the image you have stamped create a slight raised impression. Again, it is another technique that takes some practice but once you have it down you will be an ol’ pro at it in no time. Now let’s break down supplies!

Fig. 01-The Embossing heat tool.  I own both the Martha Stewart version shown above and the Zap.  I hate to say this, but I think the Zap is better, but it’s pretty darn ugly and Martha’s tool isn’t too shabby.  (Note-A lot of the major craft stores such as Michael’s and A.C. Moore have weekly half off coupons that you can use to purchase your supplies at deep discounts.  Unfortunately, the coupons are for in-store use only). These are the two heat embossing tools I recommend, I have tried others but these both surpass anything else I have tried, unlike the embossing powder not all embossing heat tools are created equal.

Fig. 02-This is optional but I highly suggest a small, fine paintbrush to have on hand to brush off excess embossing powder from your surface, I bought mine for $1.00, you may even have one laying around. Fine one that is a little stiff as too soft will be hard to maneuver.

Fig. 03-Embossing Buddy, I have this as optional and it is but gosh it so good, lasts forever and I doubt my finished embossing image would look as perfect without it. What this tool does is get rid of the static from your substrate (your cardstock) which will come in handy once we get to the actual embossing of this tutorial!

Fig. 04-Ink! Since I am discussing white with kraft, I think it’s safe to say get yourself some white ink, but you can emboss with any ink color your hear desires.  I prefer pigment inks when I am embossing they will stay wet longer than other inks.

Fig.05-Embossing powder-I really like this brand and my back-up choice would be this one. I have not noticed such a dramatic difference in embossing powders, so if you can’t find either of those, pick up what is available to you.  I chose white embossing ink for the tutorial but if you can only buy one powder get clear so you can use it with any color ink!

Fig. 06-Paper/Cardstock-I should mention a few things, what you stamp on makes a huge difference in your outcome, if you are using Kraft paper or chipboard find the smoothest one without too many fibers or something that is not too porous. I really like this kraft stock (it’s called Paper Bag) for it’s authentic look and extra smooth surface. I find a lot of kraft cardstock to be too fiber-filled to get a nice impression, but some chipboard works, it just takes a little experimenting.

Fig. 07-Rubberstamp-Not all stamps are good for this technique to create the most impressive results. I find a lot of my stamps work very well because they have nice thin lines and the embossing looks almost like thermography or better yet engraving when done right.  Stamps with more areas to cover like this one, are not as good of a choice because the embossing area will bubble and pop thus becoming bumpy, some people don’t mind that look, but I think it looks too ‘crafty’ and I never want my finished products to look ‘crafty’, I want people to pick them up and be wildly impressed that I made it and they will be don’t you worry, I promise to teach you how!

Tomorrow I will get to part II and later on this afternoon Michelle P. will be serving up a little Inspiration Rx for you!

P.P.S. We are in need of a videographer that needs to get their name out located in the Seattle area, if you have any leads or friends or even if you think YOU can do it, please email  me at besottedblog [at] gmail [dot] com a.s.a.p.!

Author / Miss Tristan B

Miss Tristan B. is the proprietress of Besotted Brand and the writer of this delightful blog. She recently re-located to sunny Seattle with her handsome husband and two pups, they are expecting a baby girl in December (possibly November). Her lofty goal here is to make this a creative resource repository and to inspire you to fall truly, madly, deeply in love with your life.

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