HOW-TO EMBOSS WITH RUBBERSTAMPS | SUPPLIES PART I

Embossing Supplies Besotted Blog

I had originally created this tutorial for another blog that I admire, so much so that I didn’t think it was good enough for them, but I do hope you still like and garner some good info from it!  Recently I have had an onslaught of emails on using white ink with kraft paper (a wonderful combo!) and how the results people were getting were not as great as they had anticipated.  Firstly, I would like to preface this by saying stamping, even though it formerly has been relegated to the craft realm it is actually a legit printing technique and takes some practice. You wouldn’t expect to have no experience with letterpress printing and belly up to the machine and have a perfect go at it would you?  Of course not!  So, give yourself a break and assume your first trial runs will be less than what you desire. Practice makes perfect–pinky promise.

Although, I wholeheartedly believe you can get great results using this white ink, you can get even better (and more professional ones) by going the embossing route. Embossing is simply having the image you have stamped create a slight raised impression. Again, it is another technique that takes some practice but once you have it down you will be an ol’ pro at it in no time. Now let’s break down supplies!

Fig. 01-The Embossing heat tool.  I own both the Martha Stewart version shown above and the Zap.  I hate to say this, but I think the Zap is better, but it’s pretty darn ugly and Martha’s tool isn’t too shabby.  (Note-A lot of the major craft stores such as Michael’s and A.C. Moore have weekly half off coupons that you can use to purchase your supplies at deep discounts.  Unfortunately, the coupons are for in-store use only). These are the two heat embossing tools I recommend, I have tried others but these both surpass anything else I have tried, unlike the embossing powder not all embossing heat tools are created equal.

Fig. 02-This is optional but I highly suggest a small, fine paintbrush to have on hand to brush off excess embossing powder from your surface, I bought mine for $1.00, you may even have one laying around. Fine one that is a little stiff as too soft will be hard to maneuver.

Fig. 03-Embossing Buddy, I have this as optional and it is but gosh it so good, lasts forever and I doubt my finished embossing image would look as perfect without it. What this tool does is get rid of the static from your substrate (your cardstock) which will come in handy once we get to the actual embossing of this tutorial!

Fig. 04-Ink! Since I am discussing white with kraft, I think it’s safe to say get yourself some white ink, but you can emboss with any ink color your hear desires.  I prefer pigment inks when I am embossing they will stay wet longer than other inks.

Fig.05-Embossing powder-I really like this brand and my back-up choice would be this one. I have not noticed such a dramatic difference in embossing powders, so if you can’t find either of those, pick up what is available to you.  I chose white embossing ink for the tutorial but if you can only buy one powder get clear so you can use it with any color ink!

Fig. 06-Paper/Cardstock-I should mention a few things, what you stamp on makes a huge difference in your outcome, if you are using Kraft paper or chipboard find the smoothest one without too many fibers or something that is not too porous. I really like this kraft stock (it’s called Paper Bag) for it’s authentic look and extra smooth surface. I find a lot of kraft cardstock to be too fiber-filled to get a nice impression, but some chipboard works, it just takes a little experimenting.

Fig. 07-Rubberstamp-Not all stamps are good for this technique to create the most impressive results. I find a lot of my stamps work very well because they have nice thin lines and the embossing looks almost like thermography or better yet engraving when done right.  Stamps with more areas to cover like this one, are not as good of a choice because the embossing area will bubble and pop thus becoming bumpy, some people don’t mind that look, but I think it looks too ‘crafty’ and I never want my finished products to look ‘crafty’, I want people to pick them up and be wildly impressed that I made it and they will be don’t you worry, I promise to teach you how!

Tomorrow I will get to part II and later on this afternoon Michelle P. will be serving up a little Inspiration Rx for you!

P.P.S. We are in need of a videographer that needs to get their name out located in the Seattle area, if you have any leads or friends or even if you think YOU can do it, please email  me at besottedblog [at] gmail [dot] com a.s.a.p.!

Author / Miss Tristan B

Miss Tristan B. is the proprietress of Besotted Brand and the writer of this delightful blog. She recently re-located to sunny Seattle with her handsome husband and two pups, they are expecting a baby girl in December (possibly November). Her lofty goal here is to make this a creative resource repository and to inspire you to fall truly, madly, deeply in love with your life.

Comments

  1. Ohhh embossing! My one true secret love….I got the Martha Stewart tool and it was a bajillion times better than the “over the stove” or the “hair dryer” or the “iron over cloth” tool that I was using before!

    • Tristan B. says:

      Kathy all those ways you described sound so dangerous, lol! I am happy that you got a tool, they last forever and I actually use mine for a lot of things like getting ink or paint to dry too, which when you are doing a lot of printing it’s nice to have the ability to speeed the drying process up!

  2. i wish you’d do a video on this >_<

  3. Hello! I cannot seem to find part 2? Also would the embossing machine work for leather? Sorry I know nothing in this field yet :/
    Thank you!

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